Denverite Abroad – Kamakura & Enoshima Island

Endoen train car

Endoen train car

Before we head out on our week-long trip around central Japan, Beth wanted to show me some of the cultural sites around her neighborhood. A short distance north by train took us to Kamakura, a bustling seaside suburb of Yokohoma. It was here that we connected to the historic Endoen electric train. A train from a by-gone era, this electric line services the small communities along the beach as well as connecting tourists to the many cultural sites along the shore. Though it runs more slowly compared to the busy JR lines I’ve grown accustom to, I really appreciated our rides on this classic train. Between the stretches that chase the sand and sea to the ones that barreled past homes and shops, I certainly could recognize the beauty in the mundane in this electric line.

Beth and I with the Big Buddha of Kamakura

Beth and I with the Big Buddha of Kamakura

After hopping on we took a short ride to Hase, the part of town that features Japan’s second largest Daibutsu, or big Buddha. Cast in 1215 this bronze Buddha towers close to 14 meters tall and weighs more than 120 tons. It has seen some rough times over the years, surviving earthquakes, floods, monsoons, and nearly constant exposure to the elements, and has undergone several restorations over the years, the most significant in 1712 and 1923. This figure draws crowds from all over and it truly a sight to behold, in and out. From the exterior it looks like a solid piece of bronze, but from inside you can see the seams that show, with artful detail, the assembly of this great giant.

After visiting the Daibutsu in the Kotokuin Temple, we made our way through the streets of Hase, which offer many shops and eateries. I got to see beautiful calligraphy and craftsmanship in a card store, as well as sampling the local treat of green tea ice cream. The bright green color may cause some alarm at first, but after one taste I was hooked, it was absolutely delicious! Walking along we paused at several art and pottery stalls, featuring beautiful works. Eventually we came to the Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine, easily Kamakura’s most important. As it turns out the weekend we visited coincided with a festival for young children in Japan, Shichi-go-san, where the children are taken to shrines to pray for good luck, happiness and to marry young. Consequently we also witnessed several traditional Meiji weddings taking place. The shrine grounds are stunning, blending the land and waterscapes with the main pathway that lead to a set of towering steps to the shrine. Once we reached the summit you could look straight down the main street of town and beyond to the sunset, truly a gorgeous sight to behold.

Us at the main shrine in Kamakura

Us at the main shrine in Kamakura

All that walking around worked up an appetite and luckily we had made plans to meet up with a crewman of Beth’s and his wife and their Japanese neighbor for dinner at a “sumo” restaurant. This restaurant prides itself on having a sumo clientele, complete with posters, massive handprints, and score cards from some of the local sumo patrons. The restaurant is quite traditional, serving the meal on a table top on the floor complete with padded pillows to sit on. We also had to remove our shoes and store them at the entryway before settling in for dinner. And while a four course meal sitting cross-legged the entire time did strain the muscles, the stomach was to reap the benefits. Each course was extremely good, each served in a unique, signature broth. The first two course were more or less soups, complete with various mushrooms, Chinese cabbage, and tofu. The second course was a little more spicy, featuring local mussels and imitation crab meat. Oh did I mention, these course were served in a giant cauldron placed in an intricate heating rack in the center of the table? Well they were, and thank goodness we had 5 people there because with any less there is no way we could have finished. Moving on we were served a tasty dish of saucy rice which bursted with flavor despite the mundane appearance. This was about the time we received a complimentary order of terriyaki chicken meatballs, my personal favorite of the evening. Finally we made our way to the final course, already feeling full and satisfied, but were happy to take in a spicy broth with udon noodles. After all that I can understand why its a “sumo” restaurant, and would certainly recommend searching one out if you ever visit Japan!

Shonan Harbor with Enoshima Island in the background

Shonan Harbor with Enoshima Island in the background

Sunday rolled around and we decided to go back to Kamakura and visit  Enoshima Island, a tourist attractions we missed the day before. While on the Endoen line in Kamakura we decided to ride it all the way out to Fujisawa, just to see what was there. Expecting to find a small residential community at the end of the train line Beth and I were surprised to find Fujisawa and a bustling city of commercial activity. Certainly off the tourist path, this town was all business with dozens of skyscrapers and elevated pathways. After walking around, visiting a local park, and enjoying a curry lunch at CoCos, we decided to head over to Enoshima Island.

Street food from Enoshima

Street food from Enoshima, we got to enjoy the tasty corn on our way back to the train later on.

Enoshima Island is a treasure trove for vacationers, Japanese and foreign alike. It was a mainstay location for the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo, with its famous Shoden Marina built for the sailing competitions. It also features a high-class onsen and hotel, dozens of Shinto shrines, and great beaches. But what the major attraction on the street seemed to be is a Japanese dish that features what looks like noodles with eyes. In reality they are little white, wormy looking fish and the Japanese love em! Add that to the squashed and dried octopus, squid, and jellyfish lines and you have yourself one seafood loving populace. I have yet to work up the nerve to try it myself, so we moved on to the shrines and famous lighthouse.

Street performer with the monkey

Street performer with the monkey

The lush and hilly island is covered in different Shinto shrines and monuments, dedicated to a host of gods and goddesses. The main building seems to be have something to do with love, luck, and relationships, as noted by the frequency of relationship oriented prayer cards, not to mention the week-long Valentines Island celebration where the everything is drapped in pink lights in February. Despite walking from shrine to shrine and through various gardens, this is still city property and the grounds are covered with trinket shops and restaurants. We even saw a street performer and his monkey do so wild tricks to a massive crowd’s amusement.

The sun sets on Enoshima Island as we make our way back to Kamakura

The sun sets on Enoshima Island as we make our way back to Kamakura

Continuing on we got to see the famous lighthouse and botanic gardens, founded by British merchant Samuel Cocking in 1880. Though much of the greenhouse area was destroyed in a 1923 earthquake, the gardens and towering lighthouse have becoming an emblem of the town, attracting thousands of visitors each week. As we made our way back we had both worked up a hunger and decided to treat ourselves to some street food. Beth’s picked out some of the best corn on the cob, complete with soy sauce dressing, while I got to try my first massive dumpling (really they are almost as big as a Chipotle burrito), but not nearly as filling. We enjoyed our street food, walked back to the train and witnessed a beautiful sunset through the windows on the way back to Kamakura, truly a great weekend exploring. Next week Tokyo…stay tuned!!!

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Posted on November 15, 2011, in Denverite Abroad and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. nice seeing you and beth together again. keep itup.

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